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Would you like full-cream, skim or camel milk in your coffee?

Would you like full-cream, skim or camel milk in your coffee? | Cafes | Scoop.it

IF YOU choose to break your scenic drive at a new bakery cafe on Steve Irwin Way, you may find some surprises on the coffee menu.

A "camelchino" worth $14.50 is one of them.

 

Located halfway between Beerwah and the Glass House Mountains in a small enclave of shops, Glasshouse Grind stocks fresh baked, preservative-free bread, fresh scrolls, savoury and sweet twists and rolls, as well as a range of coffees for the curious-minded.

 

The price tag of the camel milk coffees has proven no hump for the cafe's health-conscious clientele, Glasshouse Grind co-owner Danny Rouson says.

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Read the latest cafe and barista news, trends, statistics, market analysis in the Australian Cafe industry from key café suppliers, distributors, franchise operators, coffee experts and associations on Top4 News.
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Melbourne cafe named best for coffee

Melbourne cafe named best for coffee | Cafes | Scoop.it

MELBOURNE coffee is already famous but has official status as the best coffee in Australia, according to a survey.

 

Patricia Coffee Brewers owner Bowen Holden said he is proud to be voted to have the best coffee in Australia.

 

“We just try to buy really good coffee which has so much to do with creating a good coffee but we also have a very clean, methodical and consistent system,” Mr Holden said.

 

“People want to know what they will get from us and we make sure they get it every time.”

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The perfect cup of coffee costs $4000

The perfect cup of coffee costs $4000 | Cafes | Scoop.it

Your day's first cup of coffee, if you make it yourself, is something of a paradox.

 

To do it right demands quality ingredients and equipment, as well as focus and precision — two qualities that most of us are lacking in those perilous pre-caffeinated, post-waking minutes. You could venture out into the world and get your name misspelled on a paper cup, but that is scarcely better.

 

Enter the Jura Z6, which — in a very Swiss way — quickly, precisely, and yes, automatically makes almost any coffee drink to your exact specifications. You no longer need barista skills (or even pants) to get a perfect flat white.

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Brewed for the best, this barista knows her coffee

Brewed for the best, this barista knows her coffee | Cafes | Scoop.it

She’s from Canada, but only discovered her love for coffee when she moved to Australia 10 years ago. Now the Gladstone barista, Sara Senius, will be competing.

 

Living in Gladstone with her daughter, Sara’s barista skills will be put to test when she heads to Brisbane next week to connoisseur the best cup of coffee.

 

The mum said she will focus on her grinding and extracting technique; the two main elements of any good cuppa. “I need to focus on my grind,” she said.

 

“I will also have to ensure my extractions are within the right parameters; 25 to 30 seconds per 30ml of coffee.

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New coffee catch ups

New coffee catch ups | Cafes | Scoop.it

A new video project, Two Skinny Lattes, aims to promote Bunbury stories and the South West region.

 

Two Skinny Lattes is the brainchild of long-time friends Cliff Reeve and Dean Lomax.

 

Every few days they have been adding short videos to Youtube that show the pair visiting cafes in and around Bunbury to interview local icons about their love of the South West.

 

Mr Reeve said the pair had the idea for the new series while enjoying one of their regular coffee catch-ups.

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Coffee isn't cancerous, unless it's very hot

Coffee isn't cancerous, unless it's very hot | Cafes | Scoop.it

If you're like many Australians who enjoy a flat white in the morning, you'll be happy to know that the World Health Organisation released its long-anticipated report on coffee, and its findings bode well for your health.


In reviewing the most recent scientific evidence over the past 25 years since its last analysis on the matter, the WHO concluded that coffee should no longer be considered a carcinogen and that it may actually have positive effects for your body when it comes to two types of cancers - liver and uterine cancers.


Now before you start ordering that second flat white, it's important to know that the WHO report wasn't all good news. There was another significant finding: "Very hot" beverages "probably" cause cancer. This is mostly based on studies related to the consumption of a traditional South American beverage where the tea can be taken at temperatures around 70 degrees Celsius. That's significantly hotter than people in North America or Europe usually consume their drinks.

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How to brew the perfect cup of coffee at home, according to the founder of a popular coffee chain

How to brew the perfect cup of coffee at home, according to the founder of a popular coffee chain | Cafes | Scoop.it

Home-brewed coffee can easily taste mediocre.

 

But with the right method, you can make the perfect cup every time.

 

To learn the best way to brew coffee, Tech Insider asked Lars Akerlund, the founder of Fika. Since its launch in 2006, Fika has become the fastest growing coffee chain in New York City.

 

The water temperature and timing of the brew are the most important factors, Akerlund says. Using french press or the pour over method are best, because they give you more control over timing and temperature than an automatic coffeemaker.

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New 'coffee in a cone' trend takes the internet by storm

New 'coffee in a cone' trend takes the internet by storm | Cafes | Scoop.it

Even if you're a coffee purist angry about all the new trends brought in by coffee-loving hipsters, you will probably love this one.

 

"Coffee in a cone" is exactly that: a coffee served in a cone. But wait, there's more: the coffee is served in a chocolate-lined wafer cone (read that again and try not to salivate).

 

The new coffee specialty was born in South Africa out of the brilliant mind of barista Dayne Levinrad.

 

Levinrad told CNN that it wasn't easy to come up with a wafer cone that wouldn't leak, lined with chocolate that wouldn't melt.

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Coffee hipsterism gone too far

Coffee hipsterism gone too far | Cafes | Scoop.it

MELBOURNE’S coffee culture may have finally gone one step too far.

 

First we had ‘golden lattes’ that aren’t even made from coffee.

Now comes coffee in beakers and tubes that you have to mix yourself.

 

This is deconstructed coffee. Yes, you read that correctly.

It comes on a paddle (of course), in three separate cups, or test tubes in some cases — one with espresso, one with milk and one with water.

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You’re probably drinking coffee at the wrong time of day

You’re probably drinking coffee at the wrong time of day | Cafes | Scoop.it

The neurochemistry cycle of your body determines the best time of day to get that caffeine boost - and no, it’s not straight after waking up.

 

Wake up and smell the coffee beans. Many of us start the day in this manner, but sometimes that caffeine kick we’re after doesn’t actually kick. Turns out there’s a good reason - if you’re missing out on an energy boost from that morning cup, science has the answer.

 

The daily coffee habit isn’t just a delicious ritual, it’s also a vehicle for the planet’s most popular psychoactive drug, caffeine. People the world over rely on this central nervous system stimulant for its ability to keep them alert, despite the myriad side effects including possible anxiety and heartburn (everything in moderation, people).

 

However, as anyone who’s not a coffee addict will attest, humans are perfectly capable of staying awake without chemical help. This is thanks to our own internal chemistry, and, more specifically, a hormone called cortisol.

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What Happens To Your Brain When You Quit Coffee

What Happens To Your Brain When You Quit Coffee | Cafes | Scoop.it

Much like brushing our teeth or nailing the Vegemite-to-butter ratio on a piece of toast, stopping by the local barista is, for many Aussies, a well-established part of our morning routine.

 

Luckily for latte lovers, an increasing amount of recent research suggests coffee actually has several health benefits, including potentially make us live longer. However, this doesn't mean you have the all-clear to go on an unrestricted caffeine bender. (Sorry.)

 

Pretty much like anything else good in this world, there is a thing as 'too much' and sometimes, for health reasons or otherwise, a person might look at kicking their coffee habit for good -- a process which, unfortunately, doesn't come without its fair share of side effects.

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Would you like full-cream, skim or camel milk in your coffee?

Would you like full-cream, skim or camel milk in your coffee? | Cafes | Scoop.it

IF YOU choose to break your scenic drive at a new bakery cafe on Steve Irwin Way, you may find some surprises on the coffee menu.

A "camelchino" worth $14.50 is one of them.

 

Located halfway between Beerwah and the Glass House Mountains in a small enclave of shops, Glasshouse Grind stocks fresh baked, preservative-free bread, fresh scrolls, savoury and sweet twists and rolls, as well as a range of coffees for the curious-minded.

 

The price tag of the camel milk coffees has proven no hump for the cafe's health-conscious clientele, Glasshouse Grind co-owner Danny Rouson says.

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How your coffee habit could lead to more sustainable roads

How your coffee habit could lead to more sustainable roads | Cafes | Scoop.it

Researchers at Swinburne University of Technology may have provided coffee connoisseurs with another reason to keep drinking, developing a novel method that turns coffee grounds into building materials for roads.


Professor Arul Arulrajah, who leads the geotechnical group in the Centre for Sustainable Infrastructure at Swinburne, said he got the idea to test coffee grounds after observing baristas.


“I see the baristas throwing away the used coffee grounds and I think, ‘Why not look at this as an engineering material?’” he said.


Professor Arulrajah and PhD candidate Teck-Ang Kua collected used coffee grounds from cafés surrounding Swinburne’s Hawthorn campus and dried them in a 50°C oven for five days. They then mixed seven parts coffee grounds with three parts of slag – a waste product from steel manufacturing. A liquid alkaline solution was added as a binding agent.

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The Lazy Person's Guide To Great-Tasting Coffee

The Lazy Person's Guide To Great-Tasting Coffee | Cafes | Scoop.it

I love coffee. I drink it every day. I love trying new brewing methods at home. I’m also lazy when it comes to my daily cup of coffee. I’m not willing to go through the ridiculous steps most coffee connoisseurs suggest for the “perfect” cup. With that in mind here are a few tips I’ve picked up over the years to make a good cup of coffee as conveniently as possible.

 

Before we get started, of course the best way for lazy people to get good coffee is to go buy a cup at a coffee shop. With that out of the way, we’re talking about home brewing. There are tons of different brewing methods. If you talk to a hardcore coffee fanatic they will argue to death about how their chosen method is the best tasting method. Coffee appreciation can be so complicated that it requires a five lesson guide to really understand.

 

Unless you spend your life trying every single brewing method and experimenting with tons of different roasts, you’ll always be hunting down the perfect cup. That’s fun and fine if coffee enjoyment is your hobby, and you find joy in it, but most people don’t want to spend that much effort on their morning brew — and even some coffee connoisseurs don’t, either. Most of us just want our morning cup to not suck and be enjoyable to drink. Let’s boil that down to its essential steps.

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The top 100 cafes in Australia

The top 100 cafes in Australia | Cafes | Scoop.it

THERE’S nothing like a rubbish coffee to destroy your morning.


Too hot, too weak, terrible milk ... there are so many ways a barista can get it wrong.


To help in the quest for an on-point caffeine kick, here is the list of the top 100 coffee places in Australia.

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Fur-real, it’s Coast’s first cat cafe

Fur-real, it’s Coast’s first cat cafe | Cafes | Scoop.it

OPENING a feline-friendly cafe was a dream of self-confessed “crazy cat lady” Jackie Moureau.

 

Now that dream is becoming a reality for the Gold Coaster through her pet project – the Crazy Cat Cafe – expected to open in Surfers Paradise in August.

 

The cafe will have at least 10 resident cats in a lounge area and will have a separate cafe area selling coffee and ready-made meals.

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Canned coffee is the hot new coffee trend

Canned coffee is the hot new coffee trend | Cafes | Scoop.it

The second temperatures rise, most people make the switch from hot to iced coffee.

 

But iced coffee from coffee shops is expensive.

 

Luckily, a new type of cold brew is hitting the states and your local supermarket: canned coffee.

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Why You Should Never Freeze Your Coffee Beans

Why You Should Never Freeze Your Coffee Beans | Cafes | Scoop.it

Today, The New York Times hooked countless coffee aficionados (myself included) with a clickbait enticingly called "You Want Tastier Coffee? Freeze Beans, Then Grind." The article references a new study published in Scientific Reports that looked at grinding coffee beans at different temperatures to see how they turned out. They found that colder beans produce smaller, more consistently sized particles when you push them through a coffee grinder, and as a result, you get more flavor from less product. Intriguing? Yes. Should we all run to our freezers? Probably not.

 

"Cold is not recommended for preserving the integrity of beans," says Jeremy Lyman, co-founder of Birch Coffee. Coffee beans in the study were placed into either liquid nitrogen, a tub of dry ice, the freezer, or on the counter top before roasting. However, those beans were only kept cold for two hours in the study. When you're storing your beans in the freezer, opening and closing the door multiple times exposes them to more humidity as they defrost and refreeze. This cycle breaks down the beans faster, leaving you with stale coffee.

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Chill out ... for a good cup of coffee

Chill out ... for a good cup of coffee | Cafes | Scoop.it

Brewing a more flavoursome cup of coffee could be as simple as chilling the beans before grinding, scientists say.

 

A team from the University of Bath found that the colder the beans, the finer and more uniform the particles were from the grind.

 

The narrower distribution of particles allowed access to more flavour from the same amount of coffee during the brewing process.

 

Experts from the university worked with coffee shop Colonna & Smalls in Bath, Somerset, to examine the effect of grinding beans at different temperatures.

 

In the study, highlighted in Nature and published in Scientific Reports, the team tested the beans from room temperature to minus 196C.

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Rainbow lattes latest Melbourne coffee craze

Rainbow lattes latest Melbourne coffee craze | Cafes | Scoop.it

The world is going nuts over brightly coloured everything, like bagels and grilled cheese – and now coffee.

 

Yep, a café in Melbourne’s Brighton called Too Many Chiefs is now creating rainbow lattes with swirls of bright colours.

 

But it’s not all bad preservatives – this colourful concoction has zero caffeine and is instead made out of turmeric, beetroot and matcha.

 

The café owners claim it’s full of vitamin C, helps fight the flu, boost your immune system and acts as an anti-inflammatory.

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Why your iced coffee costs so much more than regular hot brew

Why your iced coffee costs so much more than regular hot brew | Cafes | Scoop.it

After a week of seasonably warm weather in New York, I finally made my annual switch from hot coffee to iced coffee this morning.

 

At the register, I was faced with an unpleasant reminder: Iced coffee is significantly more expensive than hot brew. My local deli charges $1.65 for a small, hot coffee and $2.45 for a small iced.

 

Over the course of a summer, that 80 cents adds up — four months of iced coffee on my walk to work will set me back around $54, almost $18 more than the equivalent amount of hot coffee would cost me.

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Upgrade Your Coffee With These 3 Easy Tips

Upgrade Your Coffee With These 3 Easy Tips | Cafes | Scoop.it

Most of us have our coffee pots brewing before our eyes are even half open. It's our morning fix, first thing, every, single, day! That oh-so-intoxicating aroma and rich flavour (and of course anticipated energy boost) keep us coming back for more in a constant cycle of brew, energise, crash, and repeat.

 

Most of us are at least somewhat aware of the acidifying effect coffee can have on our systems. This begs the question, can we upgrade our daily coffee obsession to actually make it less acidic and, dare I say, even healthy?

 

Here are three easy tips to keep our daily ritual going strong without any of the guilt or negative effects.

Top4's insight:

This 3 steps are:

 

1. Upgrade Your Beans

2. Make Your Own "Milk"

3.Add a Boost

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Coffee for a cause

Coffee for a cause | Cafes | Scoop.it

A new social enterprise from the Byron Community Centre has just launched, which aims to support local women in moving out of disadvantage and help them with work training and experience.

 

Coffee BOX is a converted shipping container located on Jonson Street, alongside the Community Centre and aims to raise funds from coffee sales.

 

General manager of the centre Cr Paul Spooner says, ‘All profits from the BOX will go back into the community, funding vital community services and providing training for local women.’

 

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Coffs coffee a top blend

Coffs coffee a top blend | Cafes | Scoop.it

WHEN you think of agriculture on the Coffs Coast, it’s often blueberries rather than coffee berries that spring to mind.

 

Well, meet local coffee growers Tibor and Michelle Pinci.

 

The Korora couple are the owners of Coffs Coast Coffee - producing and supplying Arabica coffee to local markets and further afield.

 

They're among a small handful of producers on the Coffs Coast, the furthest south Australia's coffee- growing industry operates.

It's a venture that started around eight years ago when Tibor - a trained baker - sourced seeds from across Australia.

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3D cat-uccino on the menu for coffee fans

3D cat-uccino on the menu for coffee fans | Cafes | Scoop.it

FANCY a cat jumping out of your cappuccino How about an owl, elephant or dolphin?

 

Because while a chocolate dusting or swirly milk finish is are pretty common for a morning coffee, Sea Change in Dee Why is cheering up customers with much more intricate coffee art.

 

Barista Kate Jocson taught herself the designs from YouTube and practised on other employees’ drinks.

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Coffee more than a drink for Swinburne engineers

Coffee more than a drink for Swinburne engineers | Cafes | Scoop.it

Swinburne University of Technology engineers have turned used coffee grounds into building materials for roads.

 

Professor Arul Arulrajah, who leads the geotechnical group in the Centre for Sustainable Infrastructure, has been investigating the use of recycled materials, such as crushed brick or glass and concrete, for use in road construction.

 

He is also an avid coffee drinker. “I see the baristas throwing away the used coffee grounds and I think, ‘why not look at this as an engineering material?’” he says.

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